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Unseen Science

Think small … Really, really small!

Explore augmented reality applications at Unseen Science
Explore augmented reality applications at Unseen Science
Dad lends a hand with a magnetite sand at Unseen Science
Mom helps move the magnetite sand at Unseen Science
Mom helps move the magnetite sand at Unseen Science
Mom and son keep the world from tipping at "Balance our Nano Future"
Mom and son keep the world from tipping at "Balance our Nano Future"
Totally engrossed in the properties of magnetite sand at Unseen Science
Totally engrossed in the properties of magnetite sand at Unseen Science
Learn about size and proportions as you "Build a Giant Carbon Nanotube"
Learn about size and proportions as you "Build a Giant Carbon Nanotube"
Every atom counts when you "Build a Giant Carbon Nanotube"
Every atom counts when you "Build a Giant Carbon Nanotube"
Checking out the final version of a "Giant Carbon Nanotube"
Checking out the final version of a "Giant Carbon Nanotube"
Mom can help "Build a Giant Carbon Nanotube"
Mom can help "Build a Giant Carbon Nanotube"
Checking out the final version of a "Giant Carbon Nanotube"
Checking out the final version of a "Giant Carbon Nanotube"
It takes a village to "Balance our Nano Future"
It takes a village to "Balance our Nano Future"
Trying a series of interactive challenges at "I Spy Nano"
Trying a series of interactive challenges at "I Spy Nano"

Featuring exhibits from our permanent collection, Unseen Science invites you to peek at the big science of nanotechnology and discover its real-world applications and implications. You can also view molecules through augmented reality, and look at science in a whole new way. This collection of Fleet exhibits takes you on tour of science that introduces you to the world of things that are unseen and unbelievable.

Try “I Spy Nano,” a series of interactive challenges, then search a complex image for examples of real nano products and phenomena. In “Balance Our Nano Future,” find ways of building a stable future that includes nanotechnology. The exhibit also invites you to “Build a Giant Carbon Nanotube” copy of a tiny original; explore progressively smaller magnetic materials—magnetite sand, iron powder, and ferrofluid in “Small, Smaller, Nano”; or compare the relative effects of “Static Electricity and Gravity” on beads of different sizes. 

The Nano exhibit was created by the Nanoscale Informal Science Education Network (NISE). This project was supported by the National Science Foundation under awards Nos. 05322536 and 0940143. Augmented Reality exhibits are made possible by QUALCOMM Inc, Eric and Peggy johnson and, Matt and Dawn Grob.