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The Impossible Science Festival

Impossible Science Festival logo

Have you ever wondered if invisibility was scientifically possible? Have you wanted to walk on water? Or even explore levitation? You’ll be able to do it all at the Impossible Science Festival at the Reuben H. Fleet Science Center on August 22 and 23!

Join the Non Gala Experiment

How would you like to conduct some fun and educational experiments with your friends or family, support a local nonprofit organization and be entered to win some awesome prizes, without even having to get out of your comfy clothes or leave your living room? 

Talking With the Tinkering Studio

By Ally Browne, Marketing Intern

For a limited time, the Tinkering Studio has expanded into the main gallery, giving tinkerers both young and old a chance to let their inner inventor out with fun new projects. Along with the extra space, the studio also has extended hours, always open whenever the Fleet is open, with both unfacilitated and facilitated activities.

Shocking Live Science Shows

Science gets messy at the Fleet

Don’t Try This At Home! is a series of exciting live shows, full of extreme science you won’t see anywhere else. Where else can you see an electrostatic generator make cereal fly out of your hand, or watch what happens when you attach toilet paper to a leaf blower? These shows are shocking, messy and loud, and are both educational and fun. Even the most innovative and creative young scientists can’t do these experiments anywhere else!

Galileo's By the Numbers

yummy snacks

How statistics make you hungry ...

Have you ever wondered how much food and drink Galileo's Cafe at the Reuben H. Fleet Science Center sells? Take a look at these numbers:

1,378 cups of coffee

910 tubs of popcorn

527 hot dogs

412 Dip N’ Dots

385 pretzels

Sound like a lot? Well, that’s just for the week of December 25-31, 2014! And those are only a few of Galileo's tasty items. 

Next time you're in Balboa Park and you're hungry or thirsty, stop in at Galileo's Cafe!

Five Questions Scientists Hope Rosetta Answers About Comets

Comet 67P as seen from the ESA Rosetta spacecraft

By David Harker, Associate Research Scientist, UCSD Center for Astrophysics and Space Sciences (CASS)

The primary mission of Rosetta's visit to comet 67P/Churymov–Gerasimenko is to further our understanding of the origin and evolution of our solar system. Comets can be thought of as time capsules since they formed within 100,000 years of the formation of the solar nebula, which is thought to be tens of millions of years older than the formation of the solar system 4.7 billion years ago.

Things You Might Have Missed About the Philae Landing on Comet 67P

Artist conception of the Philae lander

By David Harker, Associate Research Scientist, UCSD Center for Astrophysics and Space Sciences (CASS)

On March 2, 2004, the European Space Agency (ESA) launched the Rosetta Mission. The goal for this mission was for the Rosetta spacecraft to rendezvous with comet 67P/Churymov–Gerasimenko, which was 280 million miles away from Earth. To put this into perspective, the Earth is about 93 million miles away from the Sun. So at the point of rendezvous, comet 67P was three times the distance away from the Earth as the Earth is from the Sun.

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