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Island of Lemurs: Madagascar

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As shown in the IMAX® film "ISLAND OF LEMURS: MADAGASCAR," Fat-tailed Dwarf lemurs reside in sleeping holes found in Madagascar.
As shown in the IMAX® film "ISLAND OF LEMURS: MADAGASCAR," Fat-tailed Dwarf lemurs reside in sleeping holes found in Madagascar.
Featured in the IMAX® film "ISLAND OF LEMURS: MADAGASCAR," Indri lemurs are held sacred by local villagers in Madagascar.
Featured in the IMAX® film "ISLAND OF LEMURS: MADAGASCAR," Indri lemurs are held sacred by local villagers in Madagascar.
Pictured is a Ring-tailed lemur as seen in the IMAX® film "ISLAND OF LEMURS: MADAGASCAR."
Pictured is a Ring-tailed lemur as seen in the IMAX® film "ISLAND OF LEMURS: MADAGASCAR."
Pictured is an Eastern Grey Bamboo lemur as shown in the IMAX® film "ISLAND OF LEMURS: MADAGASCAR."
Pictured is an Eastern Grey Bamboo lemur as shown in the IMAX® film "ISLAND OF LEMURS: MADAGASCAR."
As seen in the IMAX® film "ISLAND OF LEMURS: MADAGASCAR," when traveling, Ring-tailed lemurs use their long tails like flags to keep their group together.
As seen in the IMAX® film "ISLAND OF LEMURS: MADAGASCAR," when traveling, Ring-tailed lemurs use their long tails like flags to keep their group together.
Pictured is a Ring-tailed lemur at the Anja Reserve in Madagascar as shown in the IMAX® film "ISLAND OF LEMURS: MADAGASCAR."
Pictured is a Ring-tailed lemur at the Anja Reserve in Madagascar as shown in the IMAX® film "ISLAND OF LEMURS: MADAGASCAR."
Coquerel's Sifaka lemurs spend almost half of their day foraging for food, as shown in the IMAX® film "ISLAND OF LEMURS: MADAGASCAR."
Coquerel's Sifaka lemurs spend almost half of their day foraging for food, as shown in the IMAX® film "ISLAND OF LEMURS: MADAGASCAR."

Island of Lemurs: Madagascar takes audiences on a spectacular journey to the remote and wondrous world of Madagascar, where lemurs arrived millions of years ago as castaways. They’ve since evolved into hundreds of diverse species, but are now highly endangered.

The film highlights the tireless efforts of trailblazing scientist Dr. Patricia C. Wright and her lifelong mission to help these strange and adorable creatures survive in the modern world. Among the lemurs audiences will meet are the extremely rare Greater Bamboo lemur; the smallest primate in the world, the Mouse lemur; the well-known Ring-tailed lemur; and the delightful dancing Sifaka lemur.

Writer/producer Drew Fellman says, “We hope Island of Lemurs: Madagascar will show people all over the world how special lemurs are—and how worthy they are of our admiration and protection.”

Academy Award® winner Morgan Freeman narrates the documentary. Rated G.


Lemur History

Until around 160 million years ago, Madagascar was attached to the African mainland as part of the super continent Gondwanaland (formed of Africa, South America, Australia, Antarctica, India and Madagascar). As Gondwanaland broke apart, Madagascar moved away from Africa. The first lemur-like primates on the fossil record appeared roughly 60 million years ago in mainland Africa and crossed over to Madagascar shortly thereafter.

Madagascar's lemurs—isolated from evolutionary changes of the world—radiated into the large island's many niches without much competition or predation. Today lemurs are found in virtually all of Madagascar's ecosystems and share some of the social and behavioral characteristics of monkeys, such as forming social groups, eating fruit and vegetation and being active during the day.


Lemurs Today

Madagascar is world-famous for its lemurs. These animals are unique to the island and display a range of interesting behaviors from singing like a whale (the indri) to sashaying across the sand like a ballet dancer (the sifaka).

Today Madagascar is home to nearly 60 "taxa" of lemurs (species, sub-species and populations from 33 species across five families and 14 genera), ranging in size from the 25-gram pygmy mouse lemur to the large indri. And new species are still being discovered—primate researchers speculate that 10 to 20 new species of lemurs may be described over the next generation.


Fun Facts About Lemurs

  • Madagascar is the size of Texas. Habitats on this huge island vary from tropical forests to dry deserts, and lemurs have adapted to survive in these diverse habitats.
  • There are 60 types of lemurs in Madagascar.
  • The main diet of lemurs consists of leaves and fruits. On occasions, they will even eat bugs.
  • Lemurs are a type of primate known as prosimians. This means ape!
  • Lemurs live in groups called troops.
  • Females have dominance over the male lemurs.
  • Lemurs are quite social and the troops have clearly defined male and female hierarchies.
  • Lemurs use their long tails for many forms of communication. They wipe their tails on their scent glands and wave their scent at other lemurs. This is called “stick fights.” Lemurs also walk with their tails held high in the air when moving to keep the troop (group) together.
  • The hands and feet of a lemur look very similar to humans. Their palms are covered with smooth skin, and they even have fingerprints.
  • The smallest lemur is the pygmy mouse lemur, which weighs just 1 ounce.
  • The largest lemur species is the Indri and they can weigh as much as 15 pounds.
  • A female lemur carries her newborn in her mouth until the baby is able to cling to the fur on its mother's stomach or back.
  • The babies ride on their mother’s back until they are about 3 or 4 months of age.
  • Some lemurs hibernate when food is scarce in given seasons. This helps them survive harsh conditions. 

The Fleet is pleased to offer the Rear Window closed-captioning system. When you purchase your ticket, tell the guest services associate that you would like to use the closed-caption service. The service is complimentary, and it is accessible in the upper-right seating area of the theater.

Listen in Spanish while the show plays in English. Ask for a complimentary headset at the Ticket Counter.

Assistive listening devices increase the intelligibility of theater presentations by enhancing the narration and dialogue and lowering music and sound effects. Ask for a complimentary headset at the Ticket Counter.